Heiots

Victim of girl crushes. Lover of music and books. Easily self-entertained.
Recent Tweets @heiots

helloitsthemartianspacejamjordan:

ausonia:

Ladybug in the morning dew

this raspberry is weird colours…

(via mustard-and-pickles)

bewbin:

nasa trying to eat the moon

(via factsfictions)

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)

On Mako and Stacker’s relationship

In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 

It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

(via pinkmoos)

doppelgender:

the saddest part of The Fault In Our Stars was definitely when Augustus fell into the chocolate river and got sucked up into the tube thing

(via mustard-and-pickles)

stuffman:

image

People have written a lot of touchy-feely pieces on this subject but I thought I’d get right to the heart of the matter

(via bea2me)

distant-traveller:

Betelgeuse

From the photographer: “Planet Jupiter (upper right) and bright star Betelgeuse (at Orion’s shoulder, middle top) over Jumerka mountain, Arta, Greece.” 

Image credit & copyright: Stavros Hios

charchat:

FitzSimmons + height difference

#okay but can we take a moment to talk about the fact that#THEY HAVE THE PERFECT HEIGHT DIFFERENCE EVER#look at the last gif#fitz just has to lift his arm horizontally to tuck simmons into his side#IT WOULD FIT JUST ABSOLUTELY PERFECTLY OKAY#also when they hug#she can either rest her chin on his shoulder or hide her face against his neck#and when shit happens she can hide against his chest and he can sneak his arms around her shoulders and put his cheek against her hair#HELP ME I AM SO DYING HEADCANONS ARE SURROUNDING ME#HEIGHT DIFFERENCE IS EVERYTHING TO ME#AAAAAAAAAH#fitzsimmons#leo fitz#jemma simmons#otp: the whole damn time#hot science babies#agents of shield( leo-fitz-is-a-gryffindor )

HAHAHAA  you just killed yourself and me by your headcanons and their precious height difference

and you know ppl love your tags, they’re blessed. <3

anerdyfeminist:

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.

There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.

Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.

The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?

Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

This is super interesting.

(via kylesprite)

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Slow Cooked Apple Pie Oatmeal…RECIPE

mymodernmet:

Banye, an adorable 11-year-old British Shorthair who lives in Shanghai with his owner winnnie,  looks perpetually surprised thanks to a patch of dark fur strategically grown beneath his mouth.

(via sunshine-and-pie)